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When we invest in girls and women, everybody wins! Share these infographics to show why girls and women belong at the center of sustainable development.

Sources:

  • Every two minutes, a woman dies in pregnancy or childbirth – the majority of these deaths are preventable. (UNFPA)
  • Maternal mortality is one of the leading causes of death among 15-19 years old in developing countries (Save the Children, 2012)
  • Poor nutrition among pregnant women accounts for 800,000 newborn deaths annually (The Lancet, 2013
  • The number of stillbirths that occur annually – 98% in developing countries (Every Women Every Child, 2015
  • If we meet the need for modern contraception and provide all pregnant women and newborns with quality care (Every Women Every Child, 2015)
  • Every dollar spent on scaling-up nutrition interventions for pregnant women and children yields $16 in returns (Global Nutrition Report, 2014)

Sources:

  • 225 women in developing countries have an unmet need for modern contraception (Guttmacher, 2014)
  • 2/3 of new adolescent HIV infections are among girls (United Nations Children's Fund, 2014)
  • 22,500 women died from unsafe abortion complications in 2014 (The Lancet, 2014)
  • If we provide sexual and reproductive health services and meet the need for modern contraception, every dollar spent will yield $120 in benefits (Copenhagen Consensus Center, 2015)
  • If we meet the need for modern contraception and provide all pregnant women and newborns with quality care, unintended pregnancy would decline by 70% and unsafe abortions would decline by 74% (Guttmacher, 2014)

Sources:

  • Defining Sexual Rights (WHO, 2010) (OHCHR, 2015) (IPPF, 2014)
  • Current laws against sexual orientation increase stigma and violate human rights (OHCHR, 2015)
  • 6.9 million women in developing countries were treated for complications from unsafe abortions in 2012 (Guttmacher, 2015)
  • In developing regions, 8 in 10 women with a curable sexually transmitted infections do not receive treatment (UNFPA, 2014)

Sources:

  • 1 billion people do not receive the healthcare they need (WHO, 2014)
  • 100 million people are impoverished by the cost of healthcare (WHO, 2010)
  • Suicide is now the leading cause of death among adolescent girls (WHO, 2014)
  • Vaccinating against the human papilloma virus (HPV) costs just $10-$25 per person (Harvard School of Public Health, 2014)
  • Reducing the mortality rate for ischemic heart disease and stroke by 10% in the developing world would save $25 billion per year (WHO, 2011)
 

Sources:

  • 1 in 3 women experience gender based violence in their lifetime (UNFPA)
  • 37,000 girls under age 18 are married off every day (UNFPA, 2012)
  • 200 million girls and women in 30 countries have been subjected to female genital mutilation/cutting (UNICEF, 2010)
  • Estimated cost of global inaction (Copenhagen Consensus, 2014)

Sources:

  • Only 29% of countries have achieved education gender parity at upper secondary level (UNESCO, 2015)
  • 90% of children with disabilities in developing countries do not attend school (UNICEF, 2014)
  • 2 out of 3 illiterate adults are women (UN Statistics Division, 2015)
  • 1/2 of schools lack adequate water and sanitation, which increases absenteeism among adolescent girls (UNICEF, 2013)
  • Each additional year of schooling increases the average annual GDP by 0.37% (UNESCO, 2010)
  • Every additional year of schooling for a girl increases her future earnings by 10 to 20% (UNGEI, 2014)

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Sources:

  • Women and children spend up to 5 hours per day gathering fuel for household needs (Global Alliance for Clean Cook Stoves)
  • Girls and women spend 97 billion hours finding a safe place to defecate and women and children spend 73 billion hours fetching water (WaterAid, 2013)
  • Worldwide, less than 20% of agricultural land is held by women (USAID, 2015)
  • Each $1 invested in water and sanitation in developing countries, can yield up to $46 in return (Journal of Water and Health, 2008)
  • Halving the number of people who cook with solid fuels could average $91 billion in societal benefits per year (WHO, 2006)

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Sources:

  • Despite government commitments to improve the health and wellbeing of girls and women, there has been too little action (Every Woman Every Child, 2010)
  • Many countries do not have the necessary systems to collect or track civil registration and vital statistics (IEAG, 2014)
  • The lack of gender, age, and income disaggregated data is an obstacle to addressing needs of girls and women (IEAG, 2014)
  • Open data could unlock an estimated $3 trillion in annual economic potential in seven areas of the global economy (McKinsey Global Institute, 2013)
  • Open data in education could enable $1 trillion in value every year (McKinsey Global Institute, 2013)

Sources:

  • Only 2% of the aid allocated to economic development in 2012 and 2013 prioritized gender equality (OECD, 2015)
  • Less than $400 million in funding was specifically dedicated to women’s civil society organizations in 2012 and 2013 (OECD, 2015)
  • Less than 0.4% of national budgets in 13 developing countries was allocated to ministries or agencies that addressed girls and women’s development and empowerment in 2013 (UN Women, 2015)
  • By tackling tax avoidance, counties can reclaim $160 billion in annual revenue (Christian Aid, 2014)
  • For every dollar spent on primary health goods and services in 74 high-burden countries, society would gain almost $9 in economic and social benefits by 2035 (WHO, 2013)
 

Sources:

  • Girls and Women spend 90% of their earned income on their families , while men spend only 30-40. (UNAC, 2012)
  • Female farmers having the same access to resources as men = 150 million fewer hungry people (FAO, 2011)
  • If the need for modern contraception was met...
    • Reduce unintended pregnancies by 70% (Guttmacher, 2014)
    • Reduce unsafe abortions by 74% (Guttmacher, 2014)
    • Decrease maternal deaths by 25% (Guttmacher, unpublished)
  • Each additional year of secondary schooling = 15 – 25% increase in a girls potential earning (UNICEF, 2011)
  • Sanitation would make 1.215 billion women’s lives safer and healthier (WaterAid, 2013)

Sources:

  • Half of the world’s population today - over 3.5 billion people - is under 30, mostly living in developing countries (EuroMonitor, 2012)
  • More than 39,000 girls under 18 are married each day (WHO, 2013)
  • Pregnancy and childbirth-related complications are one of the leading causes of death among girls 15-19 (WHO, 2012)
  • Young women make up more than 60% of all young people living with HIV, or 72% in sub-Saharan Africa (UNICEF, 2011)
  • In some countries, nearly half of girls report that their first sexual encounter was coerced (IPPF, 2013)

Sources:

  • The average life expectancy for women is 82 years in high-income countries and 63.1 years in low-income countries (WHO, 2014)
  • 64% of illiterate adults are women (UNESCO, 2011)
  • Girls and Women spend 90% of their earned income on their families , while men spend only 30-40. (UNAC, 2012)
  • One in four women is physically abused during pregnancy (UNFPA, 2013)
  • Globally, nearly 40% of murders of women are committed by an intimate partner (WHO, 2013)
  • Every day, 39,000 girls are forced into early marriage (WHO, 2013)
  • Women make up only 22% of Parliamentarian seats (IPU, 2015) and 8% of the world's executives (The Economist, 2005)
  • 95% of countries have a male head of state (UN Women, 2015)

Sources:

  • 225 million women in developing countries have an unmet need for family planning (Guttmacher, 2014)
  • The impact of the unmet need:
  • Spending one dollar for contraceptive services reduces the cost of pregnancy-related care by $1.47 (Guttmacher, 2014)
  • Investing $9.4 billion annually to fully meet the need for modern contraceptive services would…
    • Reduce unintended pregnancies by 70% (Guttmacher, 2014)
    • Reduce unsafe abortions by 74% (Guttmacher, 2014)
    • Decrease maternal deaths by 25% (Guttmacher, unpublished)
    • Drop newborn deaths by 18% (Guttmacher, unpublished)
 

Sources: 

  • Girls and women spend 90% of their earned income on their families, while men spend only 30-40% (UNAC, 2012)
  • Eliminating barriers to employment for girls and women could raise labor productivity by 25% in some countries (IMF, 2012)
  • Closing the gender gap in agriculture could lift 100-150 million people out of hunger (FAO, 2011)
  • Growing evidence shows that corporations led by women are more focused on sustainability (UC Berkeley Haas School of Business, 2012)
  • When 10% more girls go to school, a country’s GDP increases by an average of 3% (USAID, 2011)

Sources:

  • 31 Million girls of primary school age are not enrolled in school (UNESCO, 2013)
  • Enrollment rates in sub-Saharan Africa are:
    • 100 girls per 100 boys in pre-primary education
    • 92 girls per 100 boys in primary school
    • 84 girls per 100 boys in secondary school
    • 61 girls her 100 boys in tertiary school
  • If we could keep girls in school beyond grade 7, they would be…
    • More likely to marry 4 years later (PMNCH, 2013)
    • More likely to have an average of 2.2 fewer children (PMNCH, 2013)

Sources:

  • 289,000+ women die from pregnancy and childbirth-related complications each year (WHO, 2013)
  • Nearly 3 million newborn babies die every year (UNICEF, 2013)
  • Motherless children are up to 10 times more likely to die within 2 years of their mother’s death (UNICEF, 2013)

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Why Sport? 

  • Sport makes girls more confident, healthy, and empowered
  • The playing field is a natural space to educate girls about their health and rights
  • Sport can set girls on new, undiscovered paths
  • When a girl discovers her power on the field, she unlocks her potential off the field
  • Playing sport can promote equality and help transform gender norms
  • Engaging girls in sport boosts their potential and cultivates a generation of leaders.
 
 

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